Ludovico Einaudi

London Talk Event plus Extra Tour Date Added in Coventry


BOTH ON SALE 10AM FRIDAY 5 JULY
Tickets from serious.org.uk/einaudi


LONDON Barbican

Wednesday 31 July – SOLD OUT
Thursday 1 August – SOLD OUT
Friday 2 August – SOLD OUT
Saturday 3 August Matinee – Ludovico Einaudi: The Illustrated Afternoon ADDED

Saturday 3 August – SOLD OUT
Sunday 4 August – SOLD OUT
Monday 5 August – SOLD OUT
Tuesday 6 August – SOLD OUT


All seven London concerts of Seven Days Walking are now sold out, but Ludovico has one more event up his sleeve. He is a patron of the Serious Trust, which supports the learning and talent development work of Serious, and he has created The Illustrated Afternoon, a special afternoon concert for the Trust - in which he will talk about his music, and play extracts from new music and his favourite pieces.

Serious Trust was established as a registered charity in 2012, to support the specific areas of Serious’ work which have charitable purposes, and which are entirely dependent on additional funding to deliver.
The charity exists to fund projects which ensure:

Everyone can grow through music and music-making
Musicians can reach their full potential
The creation of innovative new music


+ AUTUMN TOUR

Due to demand we are also adding a Coventry date to Ludovico Einaudi’s Autumn tour of Seven Days Walking.


Saturday 12 October – BIRMINGHAM Symphony Hall – SOLD OUT
Sunday 13 October – BRIGHTON Dome – SOLD OUT
Monday 28 October – LIVERPOOL Philharmonic Hall – SOLD OUT
Tuesday 29 October – EDINBURGH Usher Hall – SOLD OUT
Wednesday 30 October – GLASGOW SEC Armadillo – SOLD OUT
Friday 1 November – COVENTRY Warwick Arts Centre EXTRA DATE ADDED

Saturday 2 November – NOTTINGHAM Royal Concert Hall – SOLD OUT

Ludovico
plays piano with Redi Hasa on cello and Federico Mecozzi on violin.

Seven Days Walking
is out now on Decca Records. For more detail on the album please click here



Press for his Union Chapel sold out shows in March;

'He’s successfully removed the boundaries between artist and audience and made classical music less concert-hall formal and more accessible to a broader demographic. This was evidenced in the fans, the majority of whom were of a younger generation than might be expected from a composer.'
(★★★★★ The Upcoming)


Have you seen?