LaSharVu

MANCHESTER International Festival
Pavilion Theatre Albert Square
Manchester
M2 5DB

Directions

Comprising of LaDonna Harley Peters, Sharlene Hector and Vula Malinga, the vocal powerhouse that is LaSharVu, have performed on the world's largest stages alongside the world's biggest artists. Sharlene and Vula are both lead vocalists for Basement Jaxx, touring the world with them, and now LaSharVu is their own special project in their own right.

Independently, they have provided live backing vocals to artists ranging from Sam Smith to Mary J Blige, Lalah Hathaway and Rahsaan Patterson to Corinne Bailey Rae and Emeli Sande. In the studio they have recorded for Madonna, Primal Scream, Grace Jones, Laura Mvula and Sam Smith, amongst many more. As a trio, they have toured the world with Sam Sparro and most recently, recorded vocals for Clean Bandit

Their individual successes show artists working at the highest levels of the music industry. From singing with Robert Glasper, to writing and recording on Lalah Hathaway's Grammy winning latest album, Vula has long been established as a successful soloist. She is known to the jazz community for her memorable performance at Jazz Voice in the EFG London Jazz Festival and has also appeared regularly at the BBC Proms as a featured vocalist, from 'Battle of the Bands' alongside Gregory Porter and Clare Teal to an Ibiza special with Jules Buckley and the Heritage Orchestra. Sharlene is recognised as the face and voice of Coca Cola's I Wish campaign and her voice features on hit single, Freaks by Dr Meaker. Alongside Vula and LaDonna, Sharlene is a key member of Ronnie Scott's resident band, Soul Family. LaDonna’s career highlights have included performances on the Oprah Winfrey Show with Corinne Bailey Rae and the Grammy's with Sam Smith. 

Expect to hear killer harmonies and some brand new material from three of the country's most respected vocalists. 

This event is part of Manchester International Festival (MIF) and tickets go on sale Friday 10 March.

‘Impressive harmonising and vocal acrobatics that elicited more than a few whoops of appreciation from the crowd’ 

(LondonJazz)​)